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Author Topic: Making Corncob Striker  (Read 1333 times)

Online Sir-diealot

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Making Corncob Striker
« on: January 07, 2020, 10:34:09 PM »
So what is involved in making one? Do I just drill a hole in the cob and stick a wooden dowel in it with some glue? If so what kind of glue? Should I put anything like polyurethane on the cob itself so it does not break down? Thanks for the help.
Strength does not come from winning. Your struggles develop your strengths. When you go through hardships and decide not to surrender, that is strength. Arnold Schwarzenegger

Offline TurkeyHunterML

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Re: Making Corncob Striker
« Reply #1 on: January 09, 2020, 02:28:31 PM »
I saw a you-Tube video on this once. Never done it myself.
Mike Lenga Calls (ML Calls)

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Re: Making Corncob Striker
« Reply #2 on: January 09, 2020, 09:29:15 PM »
I saw a you-Tube video on this once. Never done it myself.
I will look into it, thanks.
Strength does not come from winning. Your struggles develop your strengths. When you go through hardships and decide not to surrender, that is strength. Arnold Schwarzenegger

Offline M,Yingling

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Re: Making Corncob Striker
« Reply #3 on: January 10, 2020, 07:09:04 PM »
So what is involved in making one? Do I just drill a hole in the cob and stick a wooden dowel in it with some glue? If so what kind of glue? Should I put anything like polyurethane on the cob itself so it does not break down? Thanks for the help.

pretty much  5/16 drill bit  me i use ca glue gel works good ,,, i have done a few in past and dipped them in polyurethane put little weight to them or spray them just for light coat   ,,, seems most use them for soft calling so they like them light weight ,,would say u want the heads any where from 3 1/2in to   4in long  ,,, i know brookside use sell them pre drilled not sure if they do any longer
Not taking orders for calls at this time ,,,but my have some on hand  ,,,I Dont sell strikers
I do like copper pot calls,,,,Get them While u can
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Re: Making Corncob Striker
« Reply #4 on: January 10, 2020, 07:10:55 PM »
So what is involved in making one? Do I just drill a hole in the cob and stick a wooden dowel in it with some glue? If so what kind of glue? Should I put anything like polyurethane on the cob itself so it does not break down? Thanks for the help.

pretty much  5/16 drill bit  me i use ca glue gel works good ,,, i have done a few in past and dipped them in polyurethane put little weight to them or spray them just for light coat   ,,, seems most use them for soft calling so they like them light weight ,,would say u want the heads any where from 3 1/2in to   4in long  ,,, i know brookside use sell them pre drilled not sure if they do any longer
Thanks for the information Mike, appreciate it.
Strength does not come from winning. Your struggles develop your strengths. When you go through hardships and decide not to surrender, that is strength. Arnold Schwarzenegger

Offline Jrkimbrough

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Re: Making Corncob Striker
« Reply #5 on: January 22, 2020, 11:56:23 AM »
So what is involved in making one? Do I just drill a hole in the cob and stick a wooden dowel in it with some glue? If so what kind of glue? Should I put anything like polyurethane on the cob itself so it does not break down? Thanks for the help.

pretty much  5/16 drill bit  me i use ca glue gel works good ,,, i have done a few in past and dipped them in polyurethane put little weight to them or spray them just for light coat   ,,, seems most use them for soft calling so they like them light weight ,,would say u want the heads any where from 3 1/2in to   4in long  ,,, i know brookside use sell them pre drilled not sure if they do any longer

Agreed, most corncobs I've used were very light and needed some weight added to them.  I recently finished one with CA glue and it added enough weight to it where it sounded nice.

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Re: Making Corncob Striker
« Reply #6 on: January 22, 2020, 04:24:51 PM »
So what is involved in making one? Do I just drill a hole in the cob and stick a wooden dowel in it with some glue? If so what kind of glue? Should I put anything like polyurethane on the cob itself so it does not break down? Thanks for the help.

pretty much  5/16 drill bit  me i use ca glue gel works good ,,, i have done a few in past and dipped them in polyurethane put little weight to them or spray them just for light coat   ,,, seems most use them for soft calling so they like them light weight ,,would say u want the heads any where from 3 1/2in to   4in long  ,,, i know brookside use sell them pre drilled not sure if they do any longer

Agreed, most corncobs I've used were very light and needed some weight added to them.  I recently finished one with CA glue and it added enough weight to it where it sounded nice.
Thanks Jrk
Strength does not come from winning. Your struggles develop your strengths. When you go through hardships and decide not to surrender, that is strength. Arnold Schwarzenegger

Offline NCbowjunkie

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Re: Making Corncob Striker
« Reply #7 on: February 10, 2020, 11:00:09 AM »
I’ve been stabilizing a lot of the corn cobs for other call builders. It adds the weight needed and also drills better for the stem. Can also add some color if they want it. Give the cob a better look and feel on the finish strikers

Offline decoykrvr

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Re: Making Corncob Striker
« Reply #8 on: February 18, 2020, 03:05:16 PM »
I've made a bunch over the years and just use a light rasp on the cob then lightly sand.  My favorite is to use two different woods ie. cedar, walnut, apple, pecan, hickory, maple, dogwood, sassafras, black locust, osage etc. and make a double striker w/ a soft wood on one end and a hard wood on the other.  Cut the woods to where they will butt up in the center of the cob and cement w/ J B Weld and finish the ends by wetting and smoothing the J B Weld around the wood.  Make the wood striker inserts intentionally long so that you can trim them, round the ends, and shorten as necessary to tune the striker.  The two different woods striker allows you to make a variety of sounds by simply rotating the striker

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Re: Making Corncob Striker
« Reply #9 on: February 18, 2020, 06:40:28 PM »
I've made a bunch over the years and just use a light rasp on the cob then lightly sand.  My favorite is to use two different woods ie. cedar, walnut, apple, pecan, hickory, maple, dogwood, sassafras, black locust, osage etc. and make a double striker w/ a soft wood on one end and a hard wood on the other.  Cut the woods to where they will butt up in the center of the cob and cement w/ J B Weld and finish the ends by wetting and smoothing the J B Weld around the wood.  Make the wood striker inserts intentionally long so that you can trim them, round the ends, and shorten as necessary to tune the striker.  The two different woods striker allows you to make a variety of sounds by simply rotating the striker

Okay I am going to feel stupid asking but what do you mean by "just use a light rasp on the cob then lightly sand." Thanks for letting me know what to use to glue them in, I was unsure of that part.
Strength does not come from winning. Your struggles develop your strengths. When you go through hardships and decide not to surrender, that is strength. Arnold Schwarzenegger

Offline BigSlam51

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Re: Making Corncob Striker
« Reply #10 on: February 18, 2020, 08:37:43 PM »
I've made a bunch over the years and just use a light rasp on the cob then lightly sand.  My favorite is to use two different woods ie. cedar, walnut, apple, pecan, hickory, maple, dogwood, sassafras, black locust, osage etc. and make a double striker w/ a soft wood on one end and a hard wood on the other.  Cut the woods to where they will butt up in the center of the cob and cement w/ J B Weld and finish the ends by wetting and smoothing the J B Weld around the wood.  Make the wood striker inserts intentionally long so that you can trim them, round the ends, and shorten as necessary to tune the striker.  The two different woods striker allows you to make a variety of sounds by simply rotating the striker

Okay I am going to feel stupid asking but what do you mean by "just use a light rasp on the cob then lightly sand." Thanks for letting me know what to use to glue them in, I was unsure of that part.
A rasp is a type of metal file

Sent from my SM-N975U using Tapatalk


Online Sir-diealot

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Re: Making Corncob Striker
« Reply #11 on: February 18, 2020, 08:39:08 PM »
I've made a bunch over the years and just use a light rasp on the cob then lightly sand.  My favorite is to use two different woods ie. cedar, walnut, apple, pecan, hickory, maple, dogwood, sassafras, black locust, osage etc. and make a double striker w/ a soft wood on one end and a hard wood on the other.  Cut the woods to where they will butt up in the center of the cob and cement w/ J B Weld and finish the ends by wetting and smoothing the J B Weld around the wood.  Make the wood striker inserts intentionally long so that you can trim them, round the ends, and shorten as necessary to tune the striker.  The two different woods striker allows you to make a variety of sounds by simply rotating the striker

Okay I am going to feel stupid asking but what do you mean by "just use a light rasp on the cob then lightly sand." Thanks for letting me know what to use to glue them in, I was unsure of that part.
A rasp is a type of metal file

Sent from my SM-N975U using Tapatalk
Thank you, had never heard of that before. Is it something I could order on Amazon? I have to order some stuff to finish off my wingbone from them next month anyway.
Strength does not come from winning. Your struggles develop your strengths. When you go through hardships and decide not to surrender, that is strength. Arnold Schwarzenegger

Offline mtns2hunt

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Re: Making Corncob Striker
« Reply #12 on: February 21, 2020, 07:08:26 PM »
Any hardware store will carry a rasp.
Everyone wants to be successful - some just need help.

Offline crow

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Re: Making Corncob Striker
« Reply #13 on: March 16, 2020, 10:41:10 PM »
I've made a bunch over the years and just use a light rasp on the cob then lightly sand.  My favorite is to use two different woods ie. cedar, walnut, apple, pecan, hickory, maple, dogwood, sassafras, black locust, osage etc. and make a double striker w/ a soft wood on one end and a hard wood on the other.  Cut the woods to where they will butt up in the center of the cob and cement w/ J B Weld and finish the ends by wetting and smoothing the J B Weld around the wood.  Make the wood striker inserts intentionally long so that you can trim them, round the ends, and shorten as necessary to tune the striker.  The two different woods striker allows you to make a variety of sounds by simply rotating the striker

Okay I am going to feel stupid asking but what do you mean by "just use a light rasp on the cob then lightly sand." Thanks for letting me know what to use to glue them in, I was unsure of that part.
A rasp is a type of metal file

Sent from my SM-N975U using Tapatalk
Thank you, had never heard of that before. Is it something I could order on Amazon? I have to order some stuff to finish off my wingbone from them next month anyway.


Ask one of the Amish for a wore out horseshoeing rasp, after it is too dull for hoofs it will still be sharp enough for wood or corn cobs. They have a course side and a smoother side.

 a rasp will probably be too course to use  on a wing-bone.

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Re: Making Corncob Striker
« Reply #14 on: March 16, 2020, 11:28:12 PM »
Any hardware store will carry a rasp.

Sorry, I missed you comment until now. I ended up buying these to work on my wingbone call as well as the strikers. https://smile.amazon.com/gp/product/B07RWV4P9K/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o00_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

I've made a bunch over the years and just use a light rasp on the cob then lightly sand.  My favorite is to use two different woods ie. cedar, walnut, apple, pecan, hickory, maple, dogwood, sassafras, black locust, osage etc. and make a double striker w/ a soft wood on one end and a hard wood on the other.  Cut the woods to where they will butt up in the center of the cob and cement w/ J B Weld and finish the ends by wetting and smoothing the J B Weld around the wood.  Make the wood striker inserts intentionally long so that you can trim them, round the ends, and shorten as necessary to tune the striker.  The two different woods striker allows you to make a variety of sounds by simply rotating the striker

Okay I am going to feel stupid asking but what do you mean by "just use a light rasp on the cob then lightly sand." Thanks for letting me know what to use to glue them in, I was unsure of that part.
A rasp is a type of metal file

Sent from my SM-N975U using Tapatalk
Thank you, had never heard of that before. Is it something I could order on Amazon? I have to order some stuff to finish off my wingbone from them next month anyway.


Ask one of the Amish for a wore out horseshoeing rasp, after it is too dull for hoofs it will still be sharp enough for wood or corn cobs. They have a course side and a smoother side.

 a rasp will probably be too course to use  on a wing-bone.

I wound up buying these to work on my wingbone call as well as the strikers, I think they should work? https://smile.amazon.com/gp/product/B07RWV4P9K/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o00_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1
Strength does not come from winning. Your struggles develop your strengths. When you go through hardships and decide not to surrender, that is strength. Arnold Schwarzenegger