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Author Topic: How much noise is too much  (Read 1129 times)

Offline RiverRoost

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How much noise is too much
« on: March 24, 2019, 10:57:37 PM »
How much noise is too much noise ? Watching Pinhoti and noticed in one of the episodes they were making an awful lot of noise moving in in the dark and also switching setups while working a bird.( I know they have on mics and that amplifies a lot of the noise) just curious how much noise y’all think is too much when walking in to a bird on the roos or when moving trees to setup as I know that it’s a lot louder in the woods during early season when all the leaves are dry and crunchy.

Offline LaLongbeard

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Re: How much noise is too much
« Reply #1 on: March 25, 2019, 08:48:19 AM »
I try to make no noise at all. I’ve taken my boots off and snuck in close to Gobblers at times.
But it’s more the type of noise, all night long deer hogs coons etc. move around in the woods making a lot of noise, but it’s not the rhythmic stomping sound poeple make. How quiet the woods are makes a big difference as well with a little wind you can get away with more. Also timing, turkeys do sleep and if you go in early enough you can get close  without waking them, if you wait until he’s awake he’s listening to every sound.
Like you said the microphones have  amplified the noise, you wouldn’t be able to get away with it if it was as loud to the Gobbler as it is on video. 
« Last Edit: March 25, 2019, 07:20:04 PM by LaLongbeard »
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Offline Curtdawg88

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Re: How much noise is too much
« Reply #2 on: March 25, 2019, 09:53:41 AM »
Sneaking in in the dark I try to be as quiet as possible. Changing setups, I try to be quiet but not as quiet. Turkeys make a lot of noise all the time. If you are trying to sound like a hen why not complete it with ground noise. I actually had a turkey gobble at me walking through the woods trying to get close this weekend.


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Offline kjnengr

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Re: How much noise is too much
« Reply #3 on: March 25, 2019, 10:16:17 AM »
I try to make no noise at all. I’ve taken my boots off and snuck in close to Gobblers at times.
But it’s more the type of noise, all night long deer hogs coons etc. move around in the woods making a lot of noise, but it’s not the rhythmic stomping sound poeple make. How quiet the woods are makes a big difference as well with a little wind you can get away with more. Also timing turkeys do sleep and if you go in early enough you can get close  without waking them, if you wait until he’s awake he’s listening to every sound.
Like you said the microphones have  amplified the noise, you wouldn’t be able to get away with it if it was as loud to the Gobbler as it is on video.

This ^

No noise is better than any noise, but sound can be managed with darkness, timing, cadence, etc.  Nature isn't silent.  I once heard a survivalist say that you have to move with the "speed of the woods".  You don't have to be silent if you can blend in - and don't sound like something a predator.

I'm also sure that they vary their movements from place to place depending on the pressure on the birds; they won't do more than they know they can get away with. 


Offline GobbleNut

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Re: How much noise is too much
« Reply #4 on: March 25, 2019, 02:01:24 PM »
I try to make no noise at all. I’ve taken my boots off and snuck in close to Gobblers at times.
But it’s more the type of noise, all night long deer hogs coons etc. move around in the woods making a lot of noise, but it’s not the rhythmic stomping sound poeple make. How quiet the woods are makes a big difference as well with a little wind you can get away with more. Also timing turkeys do sleep and if you go in early enough you can get close  without waking them, if you wait until he’s awake he’s listening to every sound.
Like you said the microphones have  amplified the noise, you wouldn’t be able to get away with it if it was as loud to the Gobbler as it is on video.

This ^

No noise is better than any noise, but sound can be managed with darkness, timing, cadence, etc.  Nature isn't silent.  I once heard a survivalist say that you have to move with the "speed of the woods".  You don't have to be silent if you can blend in - and don't sound like something a predator.

I'm also sure that they vary their movements from place to place depending on the pressure on the birds; they won't do more than they know they can get away with.

Agree with all of the above.  In some cases, I will risk a little extra noise to get to a better set-up on a bird, assuming I am not risking being seen also.  As was mentioned, cadence of movement can actually be beneficial in some circumstances when moving in on a gobbler that is on the ground.  They have been known to mistake a carefully moving hunter making a little noise and calling for a real hen approaching them and come towards the noise to investigate. 
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Offline paboxcall

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Re: How much noise is too much
« Reply #5 on: March 25, 2019, 02:23:10 PM »
Early season getting to the tree and set up way extra early, while still dark, can be key especially if its dry and crunchy.

Later in the season, when the tree canopy fills in with leaves, during the early morning before fly down you can get away with being a bit more aggressive in your approach and set up.

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Offline g8rvet

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Re: How much noise is too much
« Reply #6 on: March 25, 2019, 03:00:02 PM »
When my son was just starting, I had him with me and we snuck in to a new place where I figured the birds would be roosting near during my early days of turkey hunting.  I wanted to get to the edge of the drop off.  So we snuck in as quiet as I could.  I fussed at him quietly with looks several times. Felt like we were making a ton of racket.  It was pitch black and a good thirty minutes before the faintest hint of light.  We sat down and waited.  About came out of our socks when one gobbled 30 yards away in the tree, out in the drop off.  Was very cool to watch the bird limb hop and get ready to pitch down.  Although we did not kill him, we both got a good lesson that day. 

 move with the "speed of the woods".  Very cool saying and very true.
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Offline bbcoach

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Re: How much noise is too much
« Reply #7 on: March 25, 2019, 05:24:34 PM »
Agree with the others.  No noise if possible.  If you have to make noise, then go in at least an hour before any light.  Make as little noise as possible, set down and let everything calm down.  Turkeys hear noises around and under them frequently so if you do have to make noise then get in early and settle in, be quite and limit movement until flydown.

Offline tomstopper

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Re: How much noise is too much
« Reply #8 on: March 25, 2019, 06:29:43 PM »
I was always taught to be as silent as possible no matter what I am hunting. Just been practicing this since I was a kid

Offline mtns2hunt

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Re: How much noise is too much
« Reply #9 on: March 25, 2019, 07:58:31 PM »
I would agree with staying quiet by all means even to the extreme of putting an old pair of socks over your boots if you have a big enough pair. Where I hunt I have hardwoods and pines where the turkeys roost. In the early season I hunt the pines when possible as its quiet and you can sneak in closer. Later when its leafed out I hunt more in the hardwoods. I have to admit tho that I will hunt any where if he is the only one gobbling.

I know my area extremely well and am currently following some advice I received elsewhere on this forum about building prepositioned blinds. As most of the pine stands are small I can position a blind within 100 yards. I have always felt I do not want to be directly under him. Let him stretch his wings a bit if he is coming in your direction. Never shot one that went the other way anyhow. Just my two cents.
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Offline Marc

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Re: How much noise is too much
« Reply #10 on: March 26, 2019, 01:31:14 AM »

This ^

No noise is better than any noise, but sound can be managed with darkness, timing, cadence, etc.  Nature isn't silent.  I once heard a survivalist say that you have to move with the "speed of the woods".  You don't have to be silent if you can blend in - and don't sound like something a predator.

Very good statement here...

Turkeys can be pretty loud critters, and they have a "cadence."  I have often used what I have heard referred to as "walking & talking" to gain ground on a bird.  This is basically walking through the woods with short quick steps (trying to sound like a turkey) while calling.  I have come around a bend face to face with a turkey coming to me more than once doing this.

Early morning setup is all about silence for me as well though.

Either got to be silent, or sound like the woods...  Talking is always a "no-no."
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Offline rifleman

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Re: How much noise is too much
« Reply #11 on: March 29, 2019, 04:56:04 PM »
I have used the same method as Marc does to get closer to birds when I have heard them gobble at a distance.  Usually though I sneak around like a cat using terrain and any available cover.  I must say about 4 years ago I was worn out and went back to my "go to spot" and was rebuilding a ground bling made of sticks and debris against a big tree.  Suddenly, a bird roars about 80 yds away up on the side of a bank out to my right.  I quickly got in the blind and called him in.  He had to hear my noise and maybe he thought it was hens.  Can't get in a bird's head.

Offline Crghss

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Re: How much noise is too much
« Reply #12 on: March 29, 2019, 09:07:02 PM »
Its hunting so always as silent as possible. But I just never really see turkey spook or respond to noise. Their eye sight is so good and sound carries just so far.

Once I hear a bird I find cover and sit tight. Just always afraid they’ll see me moving.

If they respond to my call then I figure I’ll get them in the rest of the way. If they’re just cruising by  then what difference does getting 75 yds closer make? Just never seemed worth the risk of moving.


Offline tal

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Re: How much noise is too much
« Reply #13 on: March 30, 2019, 02:55:29 PM »
 We all know how well a turkey can see. If you give as much consideration to their hearing you'll be ahead of the game. I've had turkeys gobble at my footsteps in the leaves at 100 plus yards that I don't think a person would hear at 20 to 30 yards.