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Author Topic: Trumpet question  (Read 657 times)

Offline fordhunt

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Trumpet question
« on: February 28, 2019, 10:50:00 AM »
Out of all the trumpet call Maker's out today .in your own opinion what is the easiest playing trumpet out there .please don't say this one because you have one .Id like to have input on someone that had plenty of experience in trumpets .thanks

Offline davisd9

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Re: Trumpet question
« Reply #1 on: February 28, 2019, 11:16:56 AM »
That is up to the individual and how they draw and such. I could tell you mine and then 3 others something different. No one would be wrong as that is what works for them. Also, an experienced player will be able to play most any with ease.


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Offline LaLongbeard

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Re: Trumpet question
« Reply #2 on: February 28, 2019, 11:28:05 AM »
The only answers your going to get are individual preferences I have owned or played most of the top makers Buice, Cox etc. If you buy a trumpet from one of the top guys non will be "hard" to play. If you've never picked up a trumpet you probably wouldn't be able to tell the difference between a 1000$ Trumpet and a 50$ Trumpet, if you have been using one awhile you should have no trouble playing any brand it will come down to personal preference on the pitch and the looks of the call. Some have a older hen yelp some are tuned for a young hen some kee kee really well some not so much.
It be like someone who's never driven a car asking which one handles the best they wouldn't know the difference between a Honda Civic and a BMW 
Buy the best Trumpet you can afford and spend a lot of time practicing. Stick with that one Trumpet until your comfortable.
I'll also say late Feb is not a good time to get into Trumpets if you plan to use one this season unless your a Trumpet prodigy
If you make everything easy how do you know when your good at anything?

Offline davisd9

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Trumpet question
« Reply #3 on: February 28, 2019, 11:58:56 AM »
Double post
« Last Edit: February 28, 2019, 12:23:15 PM by davisd9 »

"I wish I could breathe life back in him, if I could I'd hunt him again tomorrow." Ben Rogers Lee

Offline davisd9

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Trumpet question
« Reply #4 on: February 28, 2019, 12:01:23 PM »
There are some that could be recommended that would make for easier playing but you cannot nail down just one. A good one at cost is Mero. Buice are easy to play and I recommend starting with a #4. KPs are my easiest running but you will have to get lucky to find one and his list is 4 yrs last I heard. You will most certainly see a difference in a $50 trumpet to higher end depended n the maker but there are some great budget trumpets out there. Matt McLain is another great one




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« Last Edit: February 28, 2019, 12:24:17 PM by davisd9 »

"I wish I could breathe life back in him, if I could I'd hunt him again tomorrow." Ben Rogers Lee

Offline Trumpetyelper

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Re: Trumpet question
« Reply #5 on: February 28, 2019, 12:08:05 PM »
For me personally it's a Frank Cox trumpet, but there are lots of great call makers...

Offline paboxcall

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Re: Trumpet question
« Reply #6 on: February 28, 2019, 12:33:06 PM »
Buice are easy to play and I recommend starting with a #4.

 :agreed:

To go through the trumpet learning curve all over again, I would start exactly here with this advice. Almost ten years later  and lots of money buying, trading, and selling, this is where I landed. Its the trumpet and mouthpiece I use almost exclusively today.
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Offline Chris O

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Re: Trumpet question
« Reply #7 on: February 28, 2019, 01:31:31 PM »
Tough question and I agree with what everyone here has said. I have tried several different makers and all have been capable of being a go to turkey killer, but after you have had several you find some play easier than others. None are impossible to learn on from my experience. Buice’s changeable mouthpieces are a sweet deal for hunting and readily available. I have found a couple other makers recently that have really impressed me trumpet wise and they are Jeff Erb and Clay Townsend they make fantastic calls, but I think one of the easiest call for me to play is a Bent Creek cane yelper with a snow goose mouth piece it is absolutely effortless. I think this call is more like a Jordan yelper and maybe the smaller diameter cane is what makes it draw so easy. Wingbones are also easy to play so don’t rule those out. There are plenty of other makers that I didn’t mention that build awesome calls, but for me the cane yelper is the easiest to date.

Offline 2nd 100

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Re: Trumpet question
« Reply #8 on: March 03, 2019, 02:05:21 AM »
All excellent advise !! Buy the best you can afford and stick with it until you learn how to play it proficiently . I killed my first three turkeys with a Penn woods yelper back in the late 80's , several hundred kills later I have gone back to trumpets . Probably will tote at least one around my neck all the way to the grave .