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Author Topic: Wingbone vs Trumpet  (Read 711 times)

Offline southern_leo

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Wingbone vs Trumpet
« on: May 18, 2018, 07:42:43 PM »
I've got a wingbone call a buddy made me. It's very sentimental but I don't like the sound it produces. I can't make as near of realistic calls as I can produce with a pot call. Does a trumpet play easier or more realistic sounding than a wingbone? I've considered trying to work on a trumpet so I can venture into making them one day.

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Offline Chris O

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Re: Wingbone vs Trumpet
« Reply #1 on: May 18, 2018, 07:56:55 PM »
I love both and I think they play very similar. Keep practicing with that bone and you may be surprised by what you start sounding like. I always thought my first bone was crap and would not work. After I have learned to play on better bones like Mark Sharpes and Tony Ezolt,I can make that old bone sound pretty good now. You should learn about trumpets and make some. They are very addicting

Offline southern_leo

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Re: Wingbone vs Trumpet
« Reply #2 on: May 18, 2018, 09:03:03 PM »


You should learn about trumpets and make some. They are very addicting

So I've heard. That's what's got me more curious about them is that so many people like them I feel like I'm missing out lol. I LOVE pot calls and that's my main hunting call and all I make right now because I'm passionate about them and the sounds they produce. I just need to explore more on trumpets. Thanks for your reply



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Offline Jbird22

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Re: Wingbone vs Trumpet
« Reply #3 on: May 18, 2018, 10:48:06 PM »
IMO, there is a steeper learning curve with suction callers than any other type of call. It takes patience and consistent practice to be proficient with them. Once you get your draw figured out you'll be surprised with what you can do with them. I made my first wingbones a few weeks ago and they sound pretty dang good. I've owned a Doug Morgan trumpet as well as a KP trumpet going on a few years so having experience with them had to have helped with playing the wingbone. Like Chris O said, give the wingbone some time before you really decide whether you like it or not.

Offline EZ

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Re: Wingbone vs Trumpet
« Reply #4 on: May 19, 2018, 07:03:42 AM »


You should learn about trumpets and make some. They are very addicting

So I've heard. That's what's got me more curious about them is that so many people like them I feel like I'm missing out lol. I LOVE pot calls and that's my main hunting call and all I make right now because I'm passionate about them and the sounds they produce. I just need to explore more on trumpets. Thanks for your reply



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I love all calls and I have always loved a good pot call. I also love a good Trumpet, wingbone or Jordan. They have a completely different sound and an almost "mystique" about them and at times can be the ONLY call a gobbler wants to hear.

The advantage of making a trumpet is that once you figure out what internals you like, you can duplicate them. I would suggest practicing and getting really good on suction calls before you try to make any. That way, you will KNOW what you're looking for. I'm willing to bet right now that you WILL become addicted to them, lol.

Offline West Augusta

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Re: Wingbone vs Trumpet
« Reply #5 on: June 13, 2018, 09:25:22 PM »
Don't count yourself short on wingbones and trumpets.  I think that I sound like crap with them.
Gobblers must not think so.  I've killed 5 gobblers using a trumpet and they are usually older birds. 


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Offline davisd9

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Re: Wingbone vs Trumpet
« Reply #6 on: June 13, 2018, 09:38:04 PM »
I can play both but prefer a trumpet. It is easier for me to run.

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Offline SteelerFan

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Re: Wingbone vs Trumpet
« Reply #7 on: June 14, 2018, 12:03:58 AM »
Both are like riding a bike. Once you get it... you get it. Trying to explain how to ride a bike is really different than doing it.

In my humble opinion - I believe a trumpet is better to learn the dynamics on. If for no other reason than the shape. The bell and the mouthpiece are consistent in size & shape regardless of how you hold it. This eliminates a small degree of call orientation in your hand and mouth when trying to produce the desired sounds.

Once you get used to all the variables like air flow and hand shape / placement - it translates easier to the uneven shape of the bone.

Again (although it might be a silly metaphor), anyone that can ride a bike can ride just about any bike... but if you’ve never been on a bike, some might be easier to learn to ride.

Offline Sir-diealot

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Re: Wingbone vs Trumpet
« Reply #8 on: June 14, 2018, 12:25:54 PM »
Quick question related to this, do you have to place finger at the end  hole of a wingbone to create back pressure the way you do with a trumpet? Thanks.
Strength does not come from winning. Your struggles develop your strengths. When you go through hardships and decide not to surrender, that is strength. Arnold Schwarzenegger

Offline pappy

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Re: Wingbone vs Trumpet
« Reply #9 on: June 14, 2018, 01:11:47 PM »
"IMO, there is a steeper learning curve with suction callers than any other type of call. It takes patience and consistent practice to be proficient with them."
I love this reply....I have made so many trumpets over the years, and to me (like West) I think I stink at playing one, but the birds DO think otherwise.....as far as one playing easier then the other ??????? who knows, it is all in the hands of the guy or gal playing it. Getting to know your call is what it is all about. Sure a trumpet can be made more "custom" like to fit the buyers needs, but so can a wing bone, costs? Well, I have seen trumpets go for hundreds and sometimes reach thousands......but wing bones are getting there too, so in the end, use what you want practice practice practice.......just get consistent and you'll be more successful then you think.
 
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Offline ol bob

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Re: Wingbone vs Trumpet
« Reply #10 on: June 14, 2018, 04:11:24 PM »
The one thing to remember when playing a suction call what you hear is not what the birds hear if you don't believe me record your self and play it back you will be surprised at how much better you sound.

Offline West Augusta

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Re: Wingbone vs Trumpet
« Reply #11 on: June 14, 2018, 08:39:52 PM »
Trumpets and Wingbones make the BEST early morning hen tree talk.   That's all I use at first light.  You can get very quiet with a trumpet or wingbone. 


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Offline EZ

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Re: Wingbone vs Trumpet
« Reply #12 on: June 14, 2018, 08:40:34 PM »
Quick question related to this, do you have to place finger at the end  hole of a wingbone to create back pressure the way you do with a trumpet? Thanks.

Everyone has their own method. I don't really place my finger in the end on either. I just use a closed hand (fist) to choke off the air and gradually start opening up as I want the volume to increase.

As Pappy said, every call is a little different, so you need to spend a little time getting to know each call. Just remember, it's not rocket science. As you play around with the call, you will figure out what works for you and what you feel comfortable with.

BTW Pappy, that is a beautiful call!!!!!

Offline Sir-diealot

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Re: Wingbone vs Trumpet
« Reply #13 on: June 14, 2018, 09:06:58 PM »
Quick question related to this, do you have to place finger at the end  hole of a wingbone to create back pressure the way you do with a trumpet? Thanks.

Everyone has their own method. I don't really place my finger in the end on either. I just use a closed hand (fist) to choke off the air and gradually start opening up as I want the volume to increase.

As Pappy said, every call is a little different, so you need to spend a little time getting to know each call. Just remember, it's not rocket science. As you play around with the call, you will figure out what works for you and what you feel comfortable with.

BTW Pappy, that is a beautiful call!!!!!
Okay, thank you.
Strength does not come from winning. Your struggles develop your strengths. When you go through hardships and decide not to surrender, that is strength. Arnold Schwarzenegger

Offline Candyman

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Re: Wingbone vs Trumpet
« Reply #14 on: June 14, 2018, 09:37:37 PM »
The one thing to remember when playing a suction call what you hear is not what the birds hear if you don't believe me record your self and play it back you will be surprised at how much better you sound.

This is spot on!!!!  I got a bone from Mark Sharpe at the end of the 2017 season. I practiced some but wasn’t sure I was good enough with it. Fast forward to this past season. I called in front of one of my friends in a parking lot and he said “dang that sounds really good!”  I said ok if you think so I will try it on the next gobbler I get to call to. I was able to work 2 more gobblers. I called both off the limb to the gun in the same week. One had 1 7/16” spurs off private land. The other was my first public land bird from some hard hunted National forest land. He had 1 1/8” hooks.  If you have a bone or trumpet give it a try. I bet you will be surprised!  I am hooked on my Mark Sharpe Wingbone call!!!!